Copyright © 2016-2018

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1. Introduction

The Holon Platform JSON module provides the support for the JSON data-interchange format, including configuration facilities, data abstraction, PropertyBox type support and seamless integration with the most popular JSON mapping and processing libraries: Jackson and Gson.

Through the Json API, the JSON serialization and deserialization using Java object types can be handled in an abstract and implementation-independent way, easily dealing with common JSON mapping concerns such as temporal types consistent support and generic collection types, besides a full support of the Holon platform Property model out-of-the-box.

Furthermore, the JSON module faces the following integration concerns:

  • Gson GsonBuilder configuration

  • Jackson ObjectMapper configuration

  • Full support of the Java 8 date and time API for the java.time.* data types serialization and deserialization

  • Consistent Date data types handling using the ISO-8601 format

  • JAX-RS integration and auto-configuration

  • Spring boot auto-configuration

1.1. Sources and contributions

The Holon Platform JSON module source code is available from the GitHub repository https://github.com/holon-platform/holon-json.

See the repository README file for information about:

  • The source code structure.

  • How to build the module artifacts from sources.

  • Where to find the code examples.

  • How to contribute to the module development.

2. Obtaining the artifacts

The Holon Platform uses Maven for projects build and configuration. All the platform artifacts are published in the Maven Central Repository, so there is no need to explicitly declare additional repositories in your project pom file.

At the top of each section of this documentation you will find the Maven coordinates (group id, artifact id and version) to obtain the artifact(s) as a dependency for your project.

A BOM (Bill Of Materials) pom is provided to import the available dependencies for a specific version in your projects. The Maven coordinates for the core BOM are the following:

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-json-bom</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

The BOM can be imported in a Maven project in the following way:

<dependencyManagement>
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
      <artifactId>holon-json-bom</artifactId>
      <version>5.2.1</version>
      <type>pom</type>
      <scope>import</scope>
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>
</dependencyManagement>

2.1. Using the Platform BOM

The Holon Platform provides an overall Maven BOM (Bill of Materials) to easily obtain all the available platform artifacts.

3. What’s new in version 5.2.x

  • Improved nested and hierarchical PropertyBox JSON serialization and deserialization support.

  • Support for JDK 9+ module system using Automatic-Module-Name.

  • Support for JAX-RS API version 2.1.

4. What’s new in version 5.1.x

  • The new Json API is now available to easily deal with JSON serialization and deserialization in a JSON mapper/parser independent way, with full PropertyBox data type support.

  • Improved support for temporal (date and time) data types, including the java.time.* Date and Time API data types. See Date and time data types.

  • A more consistent and flexible Property set serialization and deserialization strategy when dealing with PropertyBox data types, with full support for nested PropertyBox data types and a for the property paths naming hierarchy. See Property set serialization and deserialization strategies.

5. PropertyBox type handling

The Holon platform PropertyBox API is a versatile and general-purpose data container object, which uses the Property model API to represent a data attribute and to manage the value associated to it.

The JSON module provides configuration facilities to transparently and consistently deal with the PropertyBox data type when using one of the currently supported JSON mapper implementations.

From a general point of view, the PropertyBox data type handling is implemented according to the following strategies:

5.1. Serialization

A PropertyBox instance is serialized as a JSON object. Each Property of the PropertyBox property set is serialized as a JSON object field, using the property name as JSON field name and the property value provided by the PropertyBox instance as JSON field value.

See the Property documentation section for information about the Holon platform Property model and PropertyBox API.

The property value is serialized according to its type, following the serialization strategies of the concrete JSON mapper that is used. Nested PropertyBox data types are fully supported and the standard dot (.) notation can be used, besides the more formal property path hierarchy definition, to define the JSON object internal structure with nested objects support. See Property set serialization and deserialization strategies for details.

Using standard JSON objects favors portability, allowing to parse and map PropertyBox representations in a language independent way.

5.1.1. PropertyBox properties serialization strategy

By default, only the Path type properties of the PropertyBox property set are taken into account for PropertyBox JSON serialization, and the Path name is used as the property serialization name.

See the PathProperty documentation section for details about Path type properties.

This behaviour can be changed to include any Property of the PropertyBox property set in JSON serialization, using one of the serialization strategies listed in the PropertyBoxSerializationMode enumeration, through the PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE configuration property, available from the JsonConfigProperties interface.

The PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE configuration property value can be provided either using the PropertyBox property set configuration attributes container or as a concrete JSON mapper implementation configuration attribute. See the currently supported JSON mapper implementations documentation to learn about this second configuration option.

StringProperty NAME = StringProperty.create("name"); (1)
VirtualProperty<String> VRT = VirtualProperty.create(String.class, pb -> "(" + pb.getValue(NAME) + ")")
    .name("vrt"); (2)

final PropertySet<?> PROPERTY_SET = PropertySet.builderOf(NAME, VRT).withConfiguration(
    JsonConfigProperties.PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE, PropertyBoxSerializationMode.ALL).build(); (3)

PropertyBox propertyBox = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTY_SET).set(NAME, "test").build(); (4)
1 Declare a standard String type PathProperty
2 Declare a VirtualProperty which provides the NAME property value within brackets, setting vrt as property name
3 Configure the PropertyBox serialization mode using the PropertySet configuration to include all the property set properties (not only the Path type ones according to the default behaviour)
4 When the PropertyBox is serialized into JSON, also the VRT property will be included in the JSON object, using vrt as serialization name

5.2. Deserialization

A PropertyBox instance is deserialized as a JSON object. Each JSON object field is deserialized as a Property of the PropertyBox property set, matching its name with the property name, and setting the property value in the PropertyBox instance with the deserialized JSON object field value.

See the Property documentation section for information about the Holon platform Property model and PropertyBox API.

The property value is deserialized according to its type, following the deserialization strategies of the concrete JSON mapper that is used. Nested PropertyBox data types are fully supported and the standard dot (.) notation can be used, besides the more formal property path hierarchy definition, to parse the JSON object internal structure and map it to the PropertyBox property set. See Property set serialization and deserialization strategies for details.

Since a PropertyBox type structure is defined through a property set, which declares the properties managed by the PropertyBox instance, the property set with which to deserialize the JSON object must be provided at JSON deserialization time.

This can be done using the Holon platform Context architecture, providing the deserialization property set as a context resource (typically thread-bound). To bind a PropertySet instance to the default thread-scoped context resource set, the execute(Callable operation) method can be used.

final PathProperty<Long> KEY = create("key", long.class);
final PathProperty<String> NAME = create("name", String.class);
final PropertySet<?> PROPERTIES = PropertySet.of(KEY, NAME);

PropertyBox box = PROPERTIES.execute(() -> deserializePropertyBox()); (1)
1 The deserializePropertyBox() method, which performs PropertyBox JSON deserialization, is executed after binding the PROPERTIES as a thread-scoped context resource
When using the Json API, the deserialization property set is directly provided to the Json API deserialization methods, without the need to use a context resource reference.

5.3. Property set serialization and deserialization strategies

When a PropertyBox is serialized into JSON and deserialized from JSON, its property set is used to determine the mapping between the JSON object structure and the property set properties, according to the following strategy:

Serialization:: . Any PropertyBox type Property is serialized as a nested JSON object (using the property name as the field name of the parent JSON object). . If a Path type property declares a parent paths hierarchy, it is serialized in a corresponding JSON object hierarchy, using the parent paths to reproduce a consistent nested JSON objects hierarchy. . If the dot (.) notation is used in Property name, the property name is turned into a paths hierarchy using the . character as hierarchy separator. Then the Property is serialized according to the previous point.

Example of nested PropertyBox serialization
final NumericProperty<Long> KEY = NumericProperty.longType("key");

final StringProperty NAME = StringProperty.create("name");
final StringProperty SURNAME = StringProperty.create("surname");

final PropertyBoxProperty NESTED = PropertyBoxProperty.create("nested", NAME, SURNAME); (1)

final PropertySet<?> PROPERTY_SET = PropertySet.of(KEY, NESTED); (2)

PropertyBox value = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTY_SET).set(KEY, 1L)
    .set(NESTED, PropertyBox.builder(NAME, SURNAME).set(NAME, "John").set(SURNAME, "Doe").build()).build(); (3)
1 PropertyBox type property: the property set (NAME, SURNAME) is declared at creation time
2 The actual property set is composed of the KEY and the NESTED properties
3 The result of the serialized PropertyBox value will be: {"key":1,"nested":{"name":"John","surname":"Doe"}}
Example of nested Property path serialization
final NumericProperty<Long> KEY = NumericProperty.longType("key");
final StringProperty NAME = StringProperty.create("nested.name"); (1)
final StringProperty SURNAME = StringProperty.create("nested.surname"); (2)

final PropertySet<?> PROPERTY_SET = PropertySet.of(KEY, NAME, SURNAME);

PropertyBox value = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTY_SET).set(KEY, 1L).set(NAME, "John").set(SURNAME, "Doe")
    .build(); (3)
1 The NAME property path is defined as a path hierarchy using the dot notation: nested.name
2 The SURNAME property path is defined as a path hierarchy using the dot notation: nested.surname
3 The result of the serialized PropertyBox value will be: {"key":1,"nested":{"name":"John","surname":"Doe"}}

Deserialization:: . A nested JSON object is deserialized as a PropertyBox type Property, if it is available in the PropertyBox property set with a matching name and path hierarchy. . A nested JSON object field is deserialized in a Property with a matching name and path hierarchy, if it is available in the PropertyBox property set.

So, for example, the JSON value used in the previous examples:

{
  "key":1,
  "nested":{
    "name":"John",
    "surname":"Doe"
  }
}

Can be deserialized as a PropertyBox indifferently using any of the two property sets shown in the previous examples.

6. Date and time data types

6.1. java.time.* data types support

The support for the Java 8 date and time API data types is enabled out-of-the-box, and allows to deal transparently with the temporal data types such as LocalDate, LocalTime and LocalDateTime.

This includes any temporal type Property serialized and deserialized within a PropertyBox.

See specific implementation documentation for details: Jackson implementation and Gson implementation.

6.2. java.util.Date serialization and deserialization

By default, the java.util.Date data types are serialized in JSON using the ISO-8601 format, to provide a standard and more readable way to represent date and time types in the serialized JSON output.

This includes any temporal type Property serialized and deserialized within a PropertyBox.

See specific implementation documentation for details: Jackson implementation and Gson implementation.

7. The Json API

The Json interface represents a simple Java API to serialize and deserialize Objects to and from JSON, acting as an abstraction layer for a concrete JSON parser implementation.

The Json API provides methods to serialize an Object to a JSON representation and to deserialize back an Object from a JSON representation, easily dealing with generic and collection types.

7.1. Obtain an implementation

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-json</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

The JsonProvider interface is used to provide a concrete Json API implementation.

A new JsonProvider can be registered using the default Java ServiceLoader extension, providing a com.holonplatform.json.JsonProvider file under the META-INF/services classpath folder. The javax.annotation.Priority annotation (where less priority value means higher priority order) can be used to order the Json providers when more than one is available.

Thanks to the Java ServiceLoader API, each implementation is automatically registered when the corresponding artifact is available in classpath (holon-jackson for the Jackson implementation and holon-gson for the Gson one).

To obtain the currently available Json implementation, the get() or require() methods of the Json API interface can be used. These methods adopt the following strategy to obtain the current Json API implementation:

  • If a Json implementation is available as a Holon Context resource using the com.holonplatform.json.Json resource name, this one is returned (See Context documentation for information about context scopes and resources).

  • Otherwise, if a JsonProvider is registered using the Java ServiceLoader API, it is invoked to obtain the corresponding Json implementation. When more than one JsonProvider is available, the one with the higher priority is used.

Optional<Json> jsonAPI = Json.get(); (1)

Json jsonAPI_ = Json.require(); (2)
1 Try to obtain the current Json API implementation
2 Obtain the current Json API implementation, throwing an exception if none available

7.1.1. Currently available implementations

The Holon platform currentlty makes available two Json API implementations out-of-the-box:

7.2. Serialization

To serialize an Object in JSON, the toJson method is provided:

JsonWriter toJson(Object value);

This method returns a JsonWriter instance, which represents the JSON serialization result and makes available methods to obtain the JSON data in different formats.

You can use the JsonWriter API to obtain the JSON result in the following ways:

  • Obtain it as a String

  • Obtain it as an array of bytes

  • Write it into an Appendable writer

  • Write it into an OutputStream writer, specifying the charset or using the default UTF-8 charset

The toJsonString convenience method can be used to serialize the Object and directly obtain the JSON result as a String.
Json json = Json.require(); (1)

Object myObject = getObject(); // the object to serialize

JsonWriter result = json.toJson(myObject); (2)

String asString = result.asString(); (3)
byte[] asBytes = result.asBytes(); (4)
result.write(new StringWriter()); (5)
result.write(new ByteArrayOutputStream()); (6)
result.write(new ByteArrayOutputStream(), StandardCharsets.ISO_8859_1); (7)

asString = json.toJsonString(myObject); (8)
1 Obtain a Json implementation
2 Serialize an Object
3 Get the JSON result as a String
4 Get the JSON result as an array of bytes
5 Write the JSON result into a StringWriter
6 Write the JSON result into a ByteArrayOutputStream
7 Write the JSON result into a ByteArrayOutputStream using the ISO LATIN-1 charset
8 Serialize the Object and obtain the JSON result as a String
The supported data types and their serialization strategies depends on the concrete JSON mapper implementation, including any custom serializer or serialization configuration attribute. The Json API simply delegates to the concrete backing implementation the actual JSON serialization operations, seamlessy inheriting its serialization strategy and data types support.

When the Json API is obtained using a JsonProvider, a default configuration of the backing implementation is provided by the JsonProvider implementation itself. To have more control on the concrete implementation configuration and to fine tune the JSON provider setup, you can either create your own JsonProvider implementation or directly obtain the Json API from the concrete providers implementations. See each available implementation documentation for details.

7.2.1. PropertyBox serialization

The Holon platform PropertyBox type serialization is fully supported out-of-the-box. The PropertyBox serialization strategy is described in the PropertyBox type handling section.

Json json = Json.require(); (1)

final PathProperty<Long> KEY = create("key", long.class);
final PathProperty<String> NAME = create("name", String.class);
final PropertySet<?> PROPERTIES = PropertySet.of(KEY, NAME);

PropertyBox propertyBox = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTIES).set(KEY, 1L).set(NAME, "Test").build(); (2)

final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
json.toJson(propertyBox).write(sb); (3)
1 Obtain the Json implementation
2 Build a PropertyBox with given PROPERTIES property set and set the property values
3 Serialize the PropertyBox instance and write the JSON result into a StringBuilder

7.2.2. Generic Collections serialization

The Json API provides some helpful methods to deal with generic Collection of values, in order to serialize the collection of values into a JSON array.

To serialize a collection of values into a JSON array, the toJsonArray method can be used:

<T> JsonWriter toJsonArray(Class<T> type, Collection<T> values);

The concrete value type has to be provided besides the actual Collection value.

The Json API provides some overloaded and convenience methods to use an array of values instead of a Collection and to directly obtain the JSON result as a String.
Json json = Json.require(); (1)

Collection<Integer> values = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 4);

JsonWriter result = json.toJsonArray(Integer.class, values); (2)
String asString = json.toJsonArrayString(Integer.class, values); (3)
result = json.toJsonArray(Integer.class, 1, 2, 3, 4); (4)
1 Obtain the Json implementation
2 Serialize the collection of Integer values
3 Serialize the collection of Integer values and obtain the JSON result as a String
4 Serialize an array of Integer values
The PropertyBox type is fully supported also when serializing to a JSON array. For example, to serialize two PropertyBox instances named box1 and box2, simply call the toJsonArray method providing the PropertyBox.class value type: json.toJsonArray(PropertyBox.class, box1, box2).

7.3. Deserialization

To serialize an Object from JSON, the fromJson method is provided:

<T> T fromJson(JsonReader reader, Class<T> type);

The deserialization method, besides the JSON source, requires the Object type into which to deserialize the JSON value, and returns the deserialized instance of the specified type.

The JSON source is provided using the JsonReader API, which makes available a set of methods to obtain the JSON data from different sources:

  • From a generic java.io.Reader

  • From a String

  • From an array of bytes

  • From an InputStream, optionally specifying the encoding charset or assuming UTF-8 by default

Json json = Json.require(); (1)

MyObject result = json.fromJson(JsonReader.from("[JSON string]"), MyObject.class); (2)
result = json.fromJson("[JSON string]", MyObject.class); (3)
result = json.fromJson(JsonReader.from(new byte[] { 1, 2, 3 }), MyObject.class); (4)
result = json.fromJson(JsonReader.from(new StringReader("[JSON string]")), MyObject.class); (5)
result = json.fromJson(JsonReader.from(new ByteArrayInputStream(new byte[] { 1, 2, 3 })), MyObject.class); (6)
1 Obtain the Json implementation
2 Deserialize an object of type MyObject using a String as JSON data source
3 Convenience method to provide directly a String as JSON data source
4 Deserialize an object of type MyObject using an array of bytes as JSON data source
5 Deserialize an object of type MyObject using a Reader as JSON data source
6 Deserialize an object of type MyObject using a InputStream as JSON data source
The supported data types and their deserialization strategies depends on the concrete JSON mapper implementation, including any custom deserializer or deserialization configuration attribute. The Json API simply delegates to the concrete backing implementation the actual JSON deserialization operations, seamlessy inheriting its deserialization strategy and data types support.

When the Json API is obtained using a JsonProvider, a default configuration of the backing implementation is provided by the JsonProvider implementation itself. To have more control on the concrete implementation configuration and to fine tune the JSON provider setup, you can either create your own JsonProvider implementation or directly obtain the Json API from the concrete providers implementations. See each available implementation documentation for details.

7.3.1. PropertyBox deserialization

The Holon platform PropertyBox type deserialization is fully supported out-of-the-box. The PropertyBox serialization strategy is described in the PropertyBox type handling section.

The Json API provides a set of convenience methods to deserialize a PropertyBox or a collection of PropertyBox. These methods require the deserialization property set to be provided. Overloaded methods versions are available to provide, for example, the property set as an Iterable (which includes the PropertySet interface) or as an array of Property.

Some examples:

Json json = Json.require(); (1)

final PathProperty<Long> KEY = create("key", long.class);
final PathProperty<String> NAME = create("name", String.class);
final PropertySet<?> PROPERTIES = PropertySet.of(KEY, NAME);

PropertyBox result = json.fromJson(JsonReader.from("[JSON string]"), PROPERTIES); (2)
result = json.fromJson("[JSON string]", PROPERTIES); (3)
result = json.fromJson(JsonReader.from("[JSON string]"), KEY, NAME); (4)

List<PropertyBox> results = json.fromJsonArray("[JSON string]", PROPERTIES); (5)
1 Obtain the Json implementation
2 Deserialize a PropertyBox instance from a JSON String, using PROPERTIES as property set
3 Deserialize a PropertyBox instance from a JSON String, using PROPERTIES as property set
4 Deserialize a PropertyBox instance from a JSON String, using KEY and NAME properties as property set
5 Deserialize a List of PropertyBox from a JSON array, using PROPERTIES as property set

7.3.2. JSON arrays deserialization

The Json API provides a set of convenience methods to deserialize a collection of objects from a JSON array. For this purpose, the fromJsonArray method can be used:

<T> List<T> fromJsonArray(JsonReader reader, Class<T> type);

This method behaves in the same way as the fromJson method, but returns a List of the serialized objects.

8. Supported JSON libraries

The Holon platform JSON module currently supports the Jackson and Gson libraries out-of-the-box.

See the next sections for details about each implementation.

9. Jackson integration

The Jackson library support is provided by the holon-jackson artifact:

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-jackson</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

9.1. Jackson ObjectMapper configuration

The JacksonConfiguration interface can be used to configure a Jackson ObjectMapper (or obtain an already configured one) and enable the Holon platform JSON support features, including:

  • The PropertyBox type support in JSON serialization and deserialization.

  • The java.time.* temporal types support.

  • The java.util.Date type handling using the ISO-8601 format

The JacksonConfiguration interface makes available methods to configure an existing ObjectMapper instance or to obtain an already configured one:

ObjectMapper mapper = JacksonConfiguration.configure(new ObjectMapper()); (1)

mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper(); (2)
1 Configure an ObjectMapper instance
2 Create and configure a new ObjectMapper instance

See the next sections for details about each feature.

9.1.1. PropertyBox type support

The PropertyBoxModule Jackson Module is provided to configure PropertyBox type mapping support for a Jackson ObjectMapper, providing a suitable PropertyBox type JSON serializer and deserializer. This module is automatically registered in an ObjectMapper configured through the JacksonConfiguration API, as described in Jackson ObjectMapper configuration.

The PropertyBox serialization and deserialization strategy follows the rules described in the PropertyBox type handling section.

With a properly configured ObjectMapper instance, you can deal with PropertyBox type serialization and deserialization just like any another supported object type.

final static PathProperty<Long> ID = PathProperty.create("id", Long.class);
final static PathProperty<String> DESCRIPTION = PathProperty.create("description", String.class);

final static PropertySet<?> PROPERTY_SET = PropertySet.of(ID, DESCRIPTION);

public void serializeAndDeserialize() throws JsonProcessingException {
  ObjectMapper mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper(); (1)

  PropertyBox box = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTY_SET).set(ID, 1L).set(DESCRIPTION, "Test").build(); (2)

  // serialize
  String json = mapper.writer().writeValueAsString(box); (3)
  // deserialize
  box = PROPERTY_SET.execute(() -> mapper.reader().forType(PropertyBox.class).readValue(json)); (4)
}
1 Obtain a properly configured ObjectMapper instance
2 Build a PropertyBox using PROPERTY_SET as property set
3 Serialize the PropertyBox to JSON.
4 Deserialize back the JSON value into a PropertyBox instance using PROPERTY_SET as property set, declaring it as thread-bound Context resource through the execute(…​) method

In the example above, the PropertyBox instance will be serialized as a JSON object like this:

{
  "id": 1,
  "description": "Test"
}

9.1.2. PropertyBox serialization configuration

As described in the PropertyBox properties serialization strategy section, the PropertyBox properties serialization strategy can be configured using the PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE configuration property, available from the JsonConfigProperties interface.

Besides using the PropertySet Configuration container to configure the PropertyBox properties serialization strategy, the serialization mode can be configured globally for a Jackson ObjectMapper using a Jackson Deserialization context attribute: PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE_ATTRIBUTE_NAME. SInce it is a deserialization context attribute, it has to be configured at ObjectWriter level.

final ObjectMapper mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper();

final ObjectWriter writer = mapper.writer() (1)
    .withAttribute(JsonConfigProperties.PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE_ATTRIBUTE_NAME,
        PropertyBoxSerializationMode.ALL); (2)
1 Obtain an ObjectWriter
2 Set the PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE_ATTRIBUTE_NAME attribute to PropertyBoxSerializationMode.ALL to include all the properties of the PropertyBox property set when it is serialized to JSON

9.1.3. Jackson java.time.* data types support

The Java 8 date and time API data types serialization and deserialization are supported out-of-the-box when using a Jackson ObjectMapper obtained or configured through the JacksonConfiguration API (see Jackson ObjectMapper configuration).

The jackson-datatype-jsr310 dependency is included in the artifact dependencies and the default com.fasterxml.jackson.datatype.jsr310.JavaTimeModule Jackson module is registered to enable the java.time.* objects serialization support.

By default the Jackson ObjectMapper is configured to not write dates as timestamps, to make the serialized JSON more readable and easy to understand for temporal types.

This way, you can deal transparently with the java.time.* serialization and deserialization without the need for further configurations.

Example of a LocalDate object serialization and deserialization:

ObjectMapper mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper(); (1)

LocalDate date = LocalDate.of(2018, Month.JANUARY, 5);

String serialized = mapper.writeValueAsString(date); (2)

LocalDate deserialized = mapper.readValue(serialized, LocalDate.class); (3)
1 Use a properly configured ObjectMapper instance
2 Serialize given LocalDate in JSON. This will result in "2018-01-05"
3 Deserialize back the JSON date into a LocalDate

9.1.4. ISO-8601 java.util.Date serialization

When using a Jackson ObjectMapper obtained or configured through the JacksonConfiguration API (see Jackson ObjectMapper configuration), the ISO8601DateModule module is registered by default.

This module automatically enables the java.util.Date serialization in the ISO-8601 format, to provide a standard and more readable way to represent date and time types in the serialized JSON output.

So a java.util.Date type value is serialized with the following pattern:

2018-01-05T10:30:25
The timezone offset is included if available.

Since a java.util.Date always contains all the date and time parts, the value is serialized including the time part by default.

If the java.util.Date value is serialized as a Property value within a PropertyBox, the PropertyConfiguration is checked to obtain the TemporalType of the property. If the property TemporalType is available, the java.util.Date value is serialized according to the property temporal type, i.e. as a DATE (only the date part), as a TIME (only the time part) or as a DATE_TIME (both the date and the time part).

See the PropertyConfiguration documentation for further information.
final ObjectMapper mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper();

final TemporalProperty<Date> DATE = TemporalProperty.date("date").temporalType(TemporalType.DATE); (1)

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
c.set(2018, 0, 5);

PropertyBox value = PropertyBox.builder(DATE).set(DATE, c.getTime()).build(); (2)

String json = JacksonConfiguration.mapper().writeValueAsString(value); (3)
1 Declare a TemporalProperty of java.util.Date type and set DATE as property temporal type
2 Use the property within a PropertyBox
3 The serialized JSON value will be: {"date":"2018-01-05"} not including the time part

When the java.util.Date value is not bound to a Property, you can use a ThreadLocal variable to set the current TemporalType which has to be used to serialize the date/time value. The value serialization temporal type can be setted and cleared using the setCurrentTemporalType(TemporalType temporalType) and removeCurrentTemporalType() methods of the CurrentSerializationTemporalType class.

final ObjectMapper mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper(); (1)

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
c.set(2018, 0, 5);
final Date date = c.getTime();

try {
  CurrentSerializationTemporalType.setCurrentTemporalType(TemporalType.DATE); (2)
  String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(date); (3)
} finally {
  CurrentSerializationTemporalType.removeCurrentTemporalType(); (4)
}
1 Use a properly configured ObjectMapper instance
2 Set the current TemporalType to DATE
3 Only the date part will be serialized in JSON: "2018-01-05"
4 Clear the current TemporalType

9.2. Jackson Json API implementation

Jackson can be used as Json API implementation.

When the holon-jackson artifact is present in classpath, a suitable JsonProvider is automatically registered, and the Json API implementation can be obtained through the Json.get() and Json.require() methods.

Otherwise, the Jackson Json API implementation can be directly obtained using the JacksonJson interface, through one of the create() methods.

Json jsonApi = Json.require(); (1)

jsonApi = JacksonJson.create(); (2)
1 Get the Jackson Json API implementation using the registered provider
2 Obtain the Jackson Json API implementation directly

9.3. JAX-RS integration

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-jackson-jaxrs</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

A set of JAX-RS extension features are provided to configure a JAX-RS context when using Jackson as JSON provider, to enable all the features provided by the Holon platform JSON support module and to configure the Jackson JAX-RS ObjectMapper as described in the Jackson ObjectMapper configuration section.

To setup the Jackson JAX-RS extensions, the JacksonFeature feature has to be registered in the JAX-RS application.

If you use Jersey or Resteasy as JAX-RS implementation, there is no need to explicitly register the JacksonFeature, just ensure the holon-jackson-jaxrs jar is in classpath and the Jackson support will be configured automatically, leveraging on Jersey AutoDiscoverable and Resteasy Java Service extensions features.

When the feature is registered and enabled, the following extensions will be available:

  • A JAX-RS MessageBodyReader and MessageBodyWriter for the application/json media type to handle the PropertyBox type and perform JSON serialization and deserialization, according to the default strategy as described in the PropertyBox type handling section. See PropertyBox type deserialization for details about the PropertyBox property set handling.

  • A JAX-RS javax.ws.rs.ext.ContextResolver to provide the Jackson ObjectMapper instance to be used for JSON mapping operations. By default, the provided ObjectMapper is configured as described in the Jackson ObjectMapper configuration section.

9.3.1. PropertyBox type deserialization

When a PropertyBox is used as a JAX-RS resource method parameter (for methods which declare to consume application/json media type), the deserialization of the JSON input value into a PropertyBox instance needs to know the PropertySet to use in order to create the PropertyBox instance. For this purpose, the PropertySetRef annotation can be used at method parameter level to declare the PropertySet.

The @PropertySetRef annotation allows to declare the PropertySet instance as the public static field of a given class, which must be specified in the value() annotation attribute. If more than one public static field of PropertySet type is present in the declared class, the field() annotation attribute can be used to specify the field name to use.

final static PathProperty<Integer> CODE = PathProperty.create("code", Integer.class);
final static PathProperty<String> NAME = PathProperty.create("name", String.class);

final static PropertySet<?> PROPERTYSET = PropertySet.of(CODE, NAME);

// JAX-RS example endpoint
@Path("test")
public static class Endpoint {

  @PUT
  @Path("serialize")
  @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
  public Response create(@PropertySetRef(value = ExampleJackson.class, field = "PROPERTYSET") PropertyBox data) { (1)
    return Response.accepted().build();
  }

  @GET
  @Path("deserialize")
  @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
  public PropertyBox getData() {
    return PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTYSET).set(CODE, 1).set(NAME, "Test").build();
  }

}

public void jaxrs() {
  Client client = ClientBuilder.newClient(); (2)

  PropertyBox box1 = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTYSET).set(CODE, 1).set(NAME, "Test").build();

  client.target("https://host/test/serialize").request().put(Entity.entity(box1, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)); (3)

  PropertyBox box2 = PROPERTYSET
      .execute(() -> client.target("https://host/test/deserialize").request().get(PropertyBox.class)); (4)

}
1 The data input parameter is annotated with @PropertySetRef to declare the PropertyBox deserialization property set
2 Create a JAX-RS Client
3 Perform a PUT request providing a PropertyBox value as JSON. At the endpoint resource level, the PropertyBox type input parameter of the serialize method is annotated with @PropertySetRef in order to declare the property set to use to deserialize the property box from JSON
4 Perform a GET request for a JSON serialized PropertyBox value, providing the PropertySet to use for deserialization as a Context thread-bound resource

9.3.2. Deal with the JAX-RS context ObjectMapper instance

When using the JAX-RS JacksonFeature, a default javax.ws.rs.ext.ContextResolver is registered to provide the Jackson ObjectMapper instance to be used for JSON mapping operations. The context resolver provides by default an ObjectMapper instance configured according to the Jackson ObjectMapper configuration of the Holon platform JSON module.

You can replace the default ObjectMapper instance of the JAX-RS context in the following ways:

1. Provide a custom ContextResolver:

A custom javax.ws.rs.ext.ContextResolver for the ObjectMapper type can be provided and registered in the JAX-RS application.

To ensure the default ContextResolver will not be taken into account, you can use the JAX-RS application configuration property holon.jackson.disable-resolver, setting it to true to disable the default context resolver.

To ensure PropertyBox type JSON serialization and deserialization consistency, the ObjectMapper instance should be configured registering the PropertyBoxModule Jackson module. The JacksonConfiguration API can be used for this purpose.
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON) (1)
public static class MyObjectMapperResolver implements ContextResolver<ObjectMapper> {

  private final ObjectMapper mapper;

  public MyObjectMapperResolver() {
    super();
    mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper(); (2)
    // additional ObjectMapper configuration
    // ...
  }

  @Override
  public ObjectMapper getContext(Class<?> type) {
    return mapper;
  }

}
1 The JAX-RS ContextResolver instance has to be annotated so that to declare that is bound to the application/json media type
2 The JacksonConfiguration can be used to configure the ObjectMapper instance to support the Holon platform JSON features, such as PropertyBox type mapping

2. Use the Holon platform Context:

The default ObjectMapper context resolver looks up for a context resource of ObjectMapper type using the ObjectMapper class name as resource key before returning the default ObjectMapper instance.

If the ObjectMapper type context resource is found, it is returned and used as JAX-RS ObjectMapper instance.

See Context for information about the Holon platform context and context resources handling.

This way, you can provide your own ObjectMapper instance using the Holon platform Context API to register your ObjectMapper instance as a context resource with the appropriate resource key.

final ObjectMapper mapper = JacksonConfiguration.mapper();
// additional ObjectMapper configuration
// ...

Context.get().classLoaderScope().map(s -> s.put(ObjectMapper.class.getName(), mapper)); (1)
1 The classloader context scope is used to register a custom ObjectMapper instance using the ObjectMapper class name as resource key
To ensure PropertyBox type JSON serialization and deserialization consistency, the ObjectMapper instance should be configured registering the PropertyBoxModule Jackson module. The JacksonConfiguration API can be used for this purpose.

9.3.3. JAX-RS integration configuration

The following JAX-RS application configuration properties are available to tune or disable the Jackson JAX-RS integration features:

  • holon.jackson.disable-resolver: If this property is present in JAX-RS application properties, the Jackson ObjectMapper context resolver auto-configuration is disabled.

  • holon.jackson.disable-autoconfig: If this property is present in JAX-RS application properties, all the Holon platform Jackson JAX-RS extension features will be disabled.

  • holon.jaxrs.json.pretty-print: If true, enables pretty printing of serialized JSON.

9.4. Spring integration

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-jackson-spring</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

The SpringJacksonConfiguration interface can be used to configure a Spring RestTemplate, ensuring that a MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter is registered and bound to a ObjectMapper instance correctly configured for Holon platform Jackson extensions, as described in the Jackson ObjectMapper configuration section.

@Configuration
class Config {

  @Bean
  public RestTemplate restTemplate() {
    return SpringJacksonConfiguration.configure(new RestTemplate()); (1)
  }

}
1 Create a new RestTemplate instance and configure it with the Holon platform JSON support extensions

9.5. Spring Boot integration

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-jackson-spring</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

The JacksonAutoConfiguration Spring Boot auto-configuration class is provided to automatically configure an ObjectMapper bean, if available in the Spring context, with the Holon platform JSON support extensions, as described in the Jackson ObjectMapper configuration section.

This way, the RestTemplate instances obtained through the RestTemplateBuilder Spring Boot builder will be automatically pre-configured with the Holon platform Jackson extensions.

To disable this auto-configuration feature, the JacksonAutoConfiguration class can be excluded:

@EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude={JacksonAutoConfiguration.class})

10. Gson integration

The Gson library support is provided by the holon-gson artifact:

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-gson</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

10.1. Gson GsonBuilder configuration

The GsonConfiguration interface can be used to configure a Gson GsonBuilder (or obtain an already configured one) and enable the Holon platform JSON support features, including:

  • The PropertyBox type support in JSON serialization and deserialization.

  • The java.time.* temporal types support.

  • The java.util.Date type handling using the ISO-8601 format

The GsonConfiguration interface makes available methods to configure an existing GsonBuilder instance or to obtain an already configured one:

GsonBuilder builder = GsonConfiguration.builder(); (1)

builder = GsonConfiguration.configure(new GsonBuilder()); (2)
1 Get a new pre-configured GsonBuilder
2 Configure a GsonBuilder instance

See the next sections for details about each feature.

10.1.1. PropertyBox type support

When the GsonConfiguration API is used to configure a GsonBuilder, serializers and deserializers for the PropertyBox type are registered and enabled.

The PropertyBox serialization and deserialization strategy follows the rules described in the PropertyBox type handling section.

With a properly configured GsonBuilder instance, you can deal with PropertyBox type serialization and deserialization just like any another supported object type.

final static PathProperty<Long> ID = PathProperty.create("id", Long.class);
final static PathProperty<String> DESCRIPTION = PathProperty.create("description", String.class);

final static PropertySet<?> PROPERTY_SET = PropertySet.of(ID, DESCRIPTION);

public void serializeAndDeserialize() {
  Gson gson = GsonConfiguration.builder().create(); (1)

  PropertyBox box = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTY_SET).set(ID, 1L).set(DESCRIPTION, "Test").build(); (2)

  // serialize
  String json = gson.toJson(box); (3)
  // deserialize
  box = PROPERTY_SET.execute(() -> gson.fromJson(json, PropertyBox.class)); (4)
}
1 Obtain a pre-configured Gson instance
2 Build a PropertyBox using PROPERTY_SET as property set
3 Serialize the PropertyBox to JSON.
4 Deserialize back the JSON definition to a PropertyBox instance using PROPERTY_SET as property set, declaring it as thread-bound Context resource through the execute(…​) method

In the example above, the PropertyBox instance will be serialized as a JSON object like this:

{
  "id": 1,
  "description": "Test"
}

10.1.2. PropertyBox serialization configuration

As described in the PropertyBox properties serialization strategy section, the PropertyBox properties serialization strategy can be configured using the PROPERTYBOX_SERIALIZATION_MODE configuration property, available from the JsonConfigProperties interface.

Besides using the PropertySet Configuration container to configure the PropertyBox properties serialization strategy, the serialization mode can be configured globally for a Gson GsonBuilder using the GsonConfiguration API.

GsonBuilder builder = GsonConfiguration.builder(PropertyBoxSerializationMode.ALL); (1)

builder = GsonConfiguration.configure(new GsonBuilder(), PropertyBoxSerializationMode.ALL); (2)
1 Get a new pre-configured GsonBuilder and set the serialization mode to PropertyBoxSerializationMode.ALL to include all the properties of the PropertyBox property set when it is serialized to JSON
2 Configure a GsonBuilder instance and set the serialization mode to PropertyBoxSerializationMode.ALL

10.2. Gson java.time.* data types support

The Java 8 date and time API data types serialization and deserialization are supported out-of-the-box when using a GsonBuilder obtained or configured through the GsonConfiguration API.

Supported java.time.* data types are: LocalDate, LocalTime, LocalDateTime, OffsetTime, OffsetDateTime, ZonedDateTime and Instant.

This way, you can deal transparently with the java.time.* serialization and deserialization without the need for further configurations.

Example of a LocalDate object serialization and deserialization:

Gson gson = GsonConfiguration.builder().create(); (1)

LocalDate date = LocalDate.of(2018, Month.JANUARY, 5);

String serialized = gson.toJson(date); (2)

LocalDate deserialized = gson.fromJson(serialized, LocalDate.class); (3)
1 Use a properly configured Gson instance
2 Serialize given LocalDate in JSON. This will result in "2018-01-05"
3 Deserialize back the JSON date into a LocalDate

10.3. ISO-8601 java.util.Date serialization

When using a Gson GsonBuilder obtained or configured through the GsonConfiguration API, the serialization of the java.util.Date type is made using the ISO-8601 format by default, to provide a standard and more readable way to represent date and time types in the serialized JSON output.

So a java.util.Date type value is serialized with the following pattern:

2018-01-05T10:30:25
The timezone offset is included if available.

Since a java.util.Date always contains all the date and time parts, the value is serialized including the time part by default.

If the java.util.Date value is serialized as a Property value within a PropertyBox, the PropertyConfiguration is checked to obtain the TemporalType of the property. If available, the java.util.Date value is serialized according to the property temporal type, i.e. as a DATE (only the date part), as a TIME (only the time part) or as a DATE_TIME (both the date and the time part).

See the PropertyConfiguration documentation for further information.

When the java.util.Date value is not bound to a Property, you can use a ThreadLocal variable to set the current TemporalType which has to be used to serialize the date/time value. The value serialization temporal type can be setted and cleared using the setCurrentTemporalType(TemporalType temporalType) and removeCurrentTemporalType() methods of the CurrentSerializationTemporalType class.

Gson gson = GsonConfiguration.builder().create(); (1)

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
c.set(2018, 0, 5);
final Date date = c.getTime();

try {
  CurrentSerializationTemporalType.setCurrentTemporalType(TemporalType.DATE); (2)
  String json = gson.toJson(date); (3)
} finally {
  CurrentSerializationTemporalType.removeCurrentTemporalType(); (4)
}
1 Use a properly configured Gson instance
2 Set the current TemporalType to DATE
3 Only the date part will be serialized in JSON: "2018-01-05"
4 Clear the current TemporalType

10.4. Gson Json API implementation

Gson can be used as Json API implementation.

When the holon-gson artifact is present in classpath, a suitable JsonProvider is automatically registered, and the Json API implementation can be obtained through the Json.get() and Json.require() methods.

Otherwise, the Gson Json API implementation can be directly obtained using the GsonJson interface, through one of the create() methods.

Json jsonApi = Json.require(); (1)

jsonApi = GsonJson.create(); (2)
1 Get the Gson Json API implementation using the registered provider
2 Obtain the Gson Json API implementation directly

10.5. JAX-RS integration

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-gson-jaxrs</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

A set of JAX-RS extension features are provided to configure a JAX-RS context when using Gson as JSON provider, to enable all the features provided by the Holon platform JSON support module and to configure the Gson JAX-RS context Gson instance, obtained from a GsonBuilder configured as described in the Gson GsonBuilder configuration section.

To setup the Gson JAX-RS extensions, the GsonFeature feature has to be registered in the JAX-RS application.

If you use Jersey or Resteasy as JAX-RS implementation, there is no need to explicitly register the GsonFeature, just ensure the holon-gson-jaxrs jar is in classpath and the Gson support will be configured automatically, leveraging on Jersey AutoDiscoverable and Resteasy Java Service extensions features.

When the feature is registered and enabled, the following extensions will be available:

  • A JAX-RS MessageBodyReader and MessageBodyWriter for the application/json media type to handle the PropertyBox type and perform JSON serialization and deserialization, according to the default strategy as described in the PropertyBox type handling section. See PropertyBox type deserialization for details about the PropertyBox property set handling.

  • A JAX-RS javax.ws.rs.ext.ContextResolver to provide the Gson instance to be used for JSON mapping operations. By default, the provided Gson instance is obtained from a GsonBuilder configured as described in the Gson GsonBuilder configuration section.

10.5.1. PropertyBox type deserialization

When a PropertyBox is used as a JAX-RS resource method parameter (for methods which declare to consume application/json media type), the JSON deserialization of the input into a PropertyBox instance needs to know the PropertySet to use in order to create the property box. For this purpose, the @PropertySetRef annotation can be used at method parameter level to declare the PropertySet instance to use to deserialize the property box.

The PropertySetRef annotation allows to declare the PropertySet instance as the public static field of a given class, which must be specified in the value() annotation attribute. If more than one public static field of PropertySet type is present in declared class, the field() annotation attribute can be used to specify the right field name.

final static PathProperty<Integer> CODE = PathProperty.create("code", Integer.class);
final static PathProperty<String> NAME = PathProperty.create("name", String.class);

final static PropertySet<?> PROPERTYSET = PropertySet.of(CODE, NAME);

// JAX-RS example endpoint
@Path("test")
public static class Endpoint {

  @PUT
  @Path("serialize")
  @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
  public Response create(@PropertySetRef(value = ExampleGson.class, field = "PROPERTYSET") PropertyBox data) {
    return Response.accepted().build();
  }

  @GET
  @Path("deserialize")
  @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
  public PropertyBox getData() {
    return PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTYSET).set(CODE, 1).set(NAME, "Test").build();
  }

}

public void jaxrs() {
  Client client = ClientBuilder.newClient(); (1)

  PropertyBox box1 = PropertyBox.builder(PROPERTYSET).set(CODE, 1).set(NAME, "Test").build();

  client.target("https://host/test/serialize").request().put(Entity.entity(box1, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)); (2)

  PropertyBox box2 = PROPERTYSET
      .execute(() -> client.target("https://host/test/deserialize").request().get(PropertyBox.class)); (3)

}
1 Create a JAX-RS Client
2 Perform a PUT request providing a PropertyBox value as JSON. At the endpoint resource level, the PropertyBox type input parameter of the serialize method is annotated with @PropertySetRef in order to declare the property set to use to deserialize the property box from JSON
3 Perform a GET request for a JSON serialized PropertyBox value, providing the PropertySet to use for deserialization as a Context thread-bound resource

10.5.2. Deal with the JAX-RS context Gson instance

When using the JAX-RS GsonFeature, a default javax.ws.rs.ext.ContextResolver is registered to provide the Gson instance to be used for JSON mapping operations. The context resolver provides by default an Gson instance obtained using a GsonBuilder configured according to the Gson GsonBuilder configuration of the Holon platform JSON module.

You can replace the default Gson instance of the JAX-RS context in the following ways:

1. Provide a custom ContextResolver:

A custom javax.ws.rs.ext.ContextResolver for the Gson type can be provided and registered in the JAX-RS application.

To ensure the default ContextResolver will not be taken into account, you can use the JAX-RS application configuration property holon.gson.disable-resolver, setting it to true to disable the default context resolver.

To ensure PropertyBox type JSON serialization and deserialization consistency, the GsonBuilder from which the Gson instance is obtained should be configured using the GsonConfiguration API.
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON) (1)
public static class MyObjectMapperResolver implements ContextResolver<Gson> {

  private final Gson gson;

  public MyObjectMapperResolver() {
    super();
    GsonBuilder builder = GsonConfiguration.builder(); (2)
    // additional GsonBuilder configuration
    // ...
    gson = builder.create();
  }

  @Override
  public Gson getContext(Class<?> type) {
    return gson;
  }

}
1 The JAX-RS ContextResolver instance has to be annotated so that to declare that is bound to the application/json media type
2 The GsonConfiguration can be used to configure the GsonBuilder instance to support the Holon platform JSON features, such as PropertyBox type mapping

2. Use the Holon platform Context:

The default Gson context resolver looks up for a context resource of Gson type using the Gson class name as resource key before returning the default Gson instance.

If the Gson type context resource is found, it is returned and used as JAX-RS Gson instance.

See Context for information about the Holon platform context and context resources handling.

This way, you can provide your own Gson instance using the Holon platform Context API to register your Gson instance as a context resource with the appropriate resource key.

GsonBuilder builder = GsonConfiguration.builder();
// additional GsonBuilder configuration
// ...
final Gson gson = builder.create();

Context.get().classLoaderScope().map(s -> s.put(Gson.class.getName(), gson)); (1)
1 The classloader context scope is used to register a custom Gson instance using the Gson class name as resource key
To ensure PropertyBox type JSON serialization and deserialization consistency, the GsonBuilder from which the Gson instance is obtained should be configured using the GsonConfiguration API.

10.5.3. JAX-RS integration configuration

The following JAX-RS application configuration properties are available to tune or disable the Gson JAX-RS integration features:

  • holon.gson.disable-resolver: If this property is present in JAX-RS application properties, the Gson Gson context resolver auto-configuration is disabled.

  • holon.gson.disable-autoconfig: If this property is present in JAX-RS application propertiesall the Holon platform Gson JAX-RS extension features will be disabled.

  • holon.jaxrs.json.pretty-print: If true, enables pretty printing of serialized JSON.

10.6. Spring integration

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-gson-spring</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

The SpringGsonConfiguration utility interface can be used to configure a Spring RestTemplate, ensuring that a GsonHttpMessageConverter is registered and bound to a Gson instance correctly configured for Holon platform Gson extensions, as described in the Gson GsonBuilder configuration section.

@Configuration
class Config {

  @Bean
  public RestTemplate restTemplate() {
    return SpringGsonConfiguration.configure(new RestTemplate()); (1)
  }

}
1 Create a new RestTemplate instance and configure it with the Holon platform JSON support extensions

10.7. Spring Boot integration

Maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.holon-platform.json</groupId>
<artifactId>holon-gson-spring</artifactId>
<version>5.2.1</version>

The GsonAutoConfiguration Spring Boot auto-configuration class is provided to automatically configure a Gson type singleton bean, with the Holon platform JSON support extensions, as described in the Gson GsonBuilder configuration section.

This way, the RestTemplate instances obtained through the RestTemplateBuilder Spring Boot builder will be automatically pre-configured pre-configured with the Holon platform Gson extensions.

The Gson bean auto-configuration is triggered only if a Gson type bean is not already registered in the Spring context.

To disable this auto-configuration feature, the GsonAutoConfiguration class can be excluded:

@EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude={GsonAutoConfiguration.class})

11. Loggers

By default, the Holon platform uses the SLF4J API for logging. The use of SLF4J is optional: it is enabled when the presence of SLF4J is detected in the classpath. Otherwise, logging will fall back to JUL (java.util.logging).

The logger names for the JSON module are:

  • com.holonplatform.json.gson for the Gson integration classes

  • com.holonplatform.json.jackson for the Jackson integration classes

12. System requirements

12.1. Java

The Holon Platform JSON module requires Java 8 or higher.